A Little About Me and My Blog…

Lisa professional picHi, I’m Lisa. Thanks for visiting my blog.

So, Me… I am the parent of two children, one a ‘tween and one a teen. I hold university degrees from two recognized Canadian universities. For the past four years, I have been employed as the communications director for a large religious organization based in Toronto.

And… I am also a published writer who has researched and written about health, parenting, children, education and development as a freelance writer and paid staffer for over two decades. I was also a member of the parent advisory committee and a working sub-committee for Kinark Child & Family Services which services much of the GTA and south-eastern Ontario.

While I’ve always had a keen interest in all of these subject areas, after gaining personal experience with children’s mental health, this blog moved to the forefront.

About you: I’m planning to mix real-time information and studies on kids’ mental health with a philosophical and humorous bent. Make sense? Practical? I hope so. I’d love to have your comments and questions and form a tight community around this important issue as I move forward with this blog.

Please note: I am not a medical professional and that all content on this blog is of my own opinion or that of my guests/interviewees. As well, as I am Canadian, some of the material and resources will be geared to local and regional audiences but many of the topics I cover are universal.

Want to connect? Feel free to reach out to me any time by email:

lisa.tabachnick (at) gmail.com.

29 responses to “A Little About Me and My Blog…

  1. Pingback: I’m Coming Home… | Kids & Mental Health

  2. Looking forward to your posts! Only wish the kid’s face in your photo on the top wasn’t cut off…?

  3. I think you should investigate/talk about/post about when does a child need outside help? What’s the difference between behavior issues vs. mental health issues?

  4. I think this is going to be a very important and timely blog. Thanks for allowing us to comment and join in the conversation.

  5. Lisa, really looking forward to regularily visiting your blog: )

  6. Hi Lisa. I just checked your blog out for the first time, liking the insights and the dialogue being created. I personally love the picture of you daughter, I think it’s very artistic! Her smiling eyes tell the whole story.

  7. Jan’s suggestions are the ones that came to my mind…I wonder (now two of three of my kids are adults): did I ruin them? Did I not do enough? Did I miss something? I worry.

  8. Thanks for your comments, Meghan, Penny and Barb.
    @Penny – My child’s smiling eyes thank you.
    @Barb – Yes, I think we all worry about “the parenting effect” from time to time.
    @Meg – Thank you. I really appreciate that.

  9. Pingback: You’ve Got to Fight for Your Right to…Write! | Kids & Mental Health

  10. I am so glad the Blogathon introdcued us! I’ll be following and learning. Thanks for your honest conversation!

  11. Pingback: The Top 6 Things I Learned about Blogging in a Few Weeks: An Evolving Perspective | Chain the Wolf

  12. Stephanie Murphy

    Parents, Doctors, and Pediatricians, Let’s Unite!
    As a current college student majoring in health science, I recognize that the youth of today will need the guidance of other health science college graduates in the future. After a very informative presentation, I have been convinced that mental health screenings for school aged children could not only be beneficial to the health of younger children, but also may be necessary to ensure they lead productive and sane lives into their adult years.
    Mental health assessments can be useful for school aged children by engaging the youth in an array of strategies that can simultaneously address their educational, emotional, behavioral, and developmental needs. Although historically, school-based mental health services were provided primarily to students qualified for special education services, an expansion is necessary to incorporate mental health screening and social services for all students as part of their coordinated school health program.
    I strongly believe that if children were given a yearly mental health screening from age six, many of their futures could be significantly impacted from a positive perspective. Children go through many family issues from early stages in life. Examples include divorce, death, poverty and stress. Why should we wait until they reach middle or high school to begin assisting them in addressing these issues? With such a long wait, children are forced to deal with their feelings on their own. Not everyone is capable, especially young children in knowing the correct approach in dealing with stressful situations. I wholeheartedly believe there are more benefits to this proposal and I strongly encourage the teachers and pediatricians of today to join together to make this a nationwide change.

  13. Fantastic blog! Oh how I wish my mental health problems could have been picked up and addressed when I was a child. I’ve recently been diagnosed as Bipolar. But I know I’ve had some form of mental illness since I was 11.
    I look forward to reading your blog! Karen x

  14. Heya i am for the first time here. I came across this board and I find It truly useful & it helped me out much. I am hoping to provide something again and help others like you helped me.

  15. Love your blog. Such an important topic, and the variety here is excellent. I look forward to reading more.

  16. Thank you so much, SlightlyManicMommy, Kids Social and Grief Happens. I really, really appreciate your kind comments. Please visit often and keep in touch with comments and questions.

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  18. This is a really great study for me, Ought to admit that you just are a single of the best bloggers I ever saw.Thanks for posting this informative post.

  19. Thank you for this informative blog. The charity improving the lives of those with mental health problems or learning disabilities.

  20. I am curious to find out what blog platform you have been utilizing?
    I’m experiencing some minor security problems with
    my latest blog and I’d like to find something more safeguarded.
    Do you have any solutions?

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  23. Hi Lisa, thanks for visiting my blog and the nice comment. I’m looking forward to reading your posts! I’m passionate about spreading mental health awareness, especially to kids. Take care, Jenny

  24. Pingback: The Long-Term Implications of Spanking | Kids & Mental Health

  25. Hi there,

    I wanted to drop a quick line letting you know we found your ADHD page useful! Here is the page we found: https://kidsandmentalhealth.com/2015/06/23/shake-it-up-for-adhd/

    Would you be willing to exchange links?

    We have a related article that talks about several natural remedies for dealing with ADHD symptoms. We feel people of all ages should be aware of these safer natural alternatives.

    https://www.cognitune.com/best-natural-adderall-alternatives/

    If you would like, we can create a permanent followed link to your page if you do the same for us. Our domain has some excellent authority. It will help both of our websites rank higher. Plus, I think the world could benefit from a more holistic approach to healthy living. =)

    We rarely ever reach out for this type of arrangement but thought you would be receptive to it. Please let us know if you want to exchange link placements within the next day or so.

    Best,
    Jessica Hallek
    Marketing Director, COGNITUNE LLC

  26. Pingback: What is Rejection Sensitive Dysphoria? | Kids & Mental Health

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