Tag Archives: child’s voice

You’re Getting Sleepy

sunsetThis post contains affiliate links which means if you purchase any of the items listed, I may receive a commission at no additional cost to you.

Earlier today, I posted a status update on Facebook about feeling like “a zombie in the sunshine” after experiencing a terrible night’s sleep. (Full disclosure: I was sleeping with my daughter who was tossing and turning though really I’m not a great sleeper at the best of times.)

As we all know, sleep can be a challenge for adults and children alike. According to the Better Sleep Council, toddlers, children and teens need a minimum of 10 hours of sleep to stay healthy, babies need 16 and adults require 8. Lack of sleep can cause disturbances in mood, behaviour, learning ability, friendships, processing, relationships and work.

My status update received about a dozen replies and lots of advice. Suggestions included everything from taking magnesium (which I do) to using essential oils (wild orange on the big toes – who knew?!) to listening to relaxing, sleep-inducing music.

I’m a big fan of essential oils. We’ve used them in the diffuser; mixed with coconut oil for stomach aches, headaches and cramps; and I even ingested a tiny dollop of oregano oil when I had a cold. (It worked but it was one of the worst tastes I’ve ever experienced.)

For years, I (and sometimes my children) have used a white noise machine to block out extraneous noises and mimic sounds from the womb. It works like a charm, especially for those who are light sleepers.

Still, no matter what tips and tricks make for decent slumber, I’d love to have consistently good restful sleep. It makes life so much easier.

What’s your experience with sleep? Are you and your kids naturally good sleepers? If not, what’s your best tip? Please share. I’d be ever so grateful.

Can We Handle The Truth?

Photographer attribution: "Aboriginal War Veterans monument (close)" by I, Padraic Ryan. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Photographer attribution: “Aboriginal War Veterans monument (close)” by I, Padraic Ryan. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons.

Here in Canada, The Truth & Reconciliation Commission (TRC) has just concluded.  The TRC took an in depth look at how and why 150,000 First Nations children were not only taken against their will and forced to attend church-run “schools” starting in the 1950s but why so many were abused – sexually, physically and mentally – most for years at a time.

Labeled a “cultural genocide” by one TRC investigator, Canadians as a whole will have to reconcile this terrible time in history and understand why non-Indian and religious leaders felt they had a right to overtake a community and force thousands against their will. The results for many are a lifetime of anguish and mental health challenges including depression, anger, anxiety, sadness, grief and suicide.

The stories, pictures, anecdotes from the official testimony are heart-wrenching. Children as young as five years old were severely beaten and raped; First Nations people were made to feel like second-class citizens and, for decades, no one did anything about it – either through apathy or ignorance.

I’ll be the first to admit that I have much to learn about this period and about the First Nations experience. I know many friends and neighbours are horrified and embarrassed that we did nothing to stop it.

But, this is the truth and we all need to learn from it.

[Note: I’m happy to receive constructive criticism about First Nations, TRC or any other fact or idea mentioned here. Feel free to comment or email me directly.]

You’re the Voice Inside Their Head

Admission: I’ve missed my self-imposed weekly deadline by about 9 hours. You know what? After the day I had yesterday, I’m going to give myself a break. Enjoy the post.

Image

Help me shape my brain, will you?

Being a writer and a “people person” (whether that’s virtual or IRL) I tend to be on social media a lot. Now, I’m not even close to the top of the heap for followers, friends, link-ers, plus-ers, pin-ers, etc., but I do post information, thoughts, images and review others’ posts almost daily.

If you’re on Facebook, you know it’s rife with serious or tongue-in-cheek e-cards, mini-posters and political statements. I see dozens each day. However, recently, a friend posted an inspirational ad which really struck me.

It said something like, “The way you speak to your child will be the voice inside their head.”

Why did it strike such a chord with me? I’m not sure but I’ve been thinking about the statement ever since I saw it. Perhaps it’s because I have so much going on in my own brain – always have. Conversations, admonishments, occasional encouragements, comments, questions, nagging reminders…the list (and those nagging reminders) goes on and on.

If mine is going to be the voice inside my child’s head, I want it to be the practical yet positive lead cheerleader not the bitter, angry football coach. I know firsthand how harsh inner voices (read: critics) can be and, ideally, my children’s not-so-silent inner voices will be shouting out, “Way to go!” and “Keep your head held high” instead of, “Why are you so stupid?” or “Try harder next time, moron”.

What does your inner voice have to say today?